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Posts Tagged ‘HDR’

They’re Here! They’re Here! They’re Finally Here!!! Samsung Launches HDR Monitors with FreeSync 2

The greatest technology I've seen on monitors recently is HDR. It brings so much to the image quality of displays, but monitors have been a bit slow on the adoption. Samsung just changed that with the release of the CHG 90 and CHG70. The latter is surprisingly affordable and has FreeSync 2.



Is Nvidia Faking HDR? I don’t think it’s that Simple

It's easy to point the finger, but I doubt Nvidia was deliberately trying to fake HDR. Even though the monitor technology looks great, it takes a lot of support to implement properly. Firmware, driver, and software issues could all factor in. It's likely too since HDR in the past has been brilliant.



CES 2017: RBT, Samsung, Nvidia, Intel

This is it, the last bit of our coverage of CES 2017. We’ll have one more piece that will go through our top picks, but this is the last of the show floors we were able to get to. We had a mouse that’s trying to put an end to carpal tunnel, some great storage and monitor solutions from Samsung, the HDR display I’ve been dreaming of and some better explanations of what is going on with the architecture in Kaby Lake. CES 2017 was a great show and it sets us up for a great looking year for PC hardware. As always, feel free to leave your comments about what you loved in the forums and keep checking PureOC for more upcoming news and reviews!



Where’s the HDR Monitors Already?

I’ve been across a lot of forums and comment sections that talk about 4K being the future, followed by¬†8K after that when it comes to monitor technology. However, if you do the math for what pixels the human eye can actually see, 1440p is all anyone should ever need. Why is 4K so much better then? The answer lies in what colors the pixels can actually reproduce. Because of this, more pixels end up looking better color wise once they’re grouped up, even though the human eye can’t discern the individual pixels at a normal viewing distance. The patches of color start showing more variance at higher resolutions, tricking us into thinking it’s the higher resolution itself that’s better. AMD stated at CES, earlier this year, that we need better pixels. While the human eye may not work well compared to the magnifying focus of an eagle eye, what it can see as far as the range of colors is concerned is pretty amazing. If pixels aren’t reproducing colors to the extent that the human eye can see them, shades blur together making images look flat, rather than vibrant and varied. This is where High Dynamic Range (HDR) comes into play. HDR can almost reproduce all the colors the human eye can see on an individual pixel basis. This means that a 1080p monitor can actually look better than a 4K that isn’t using HDR. Some of you may be reading this and thinking that it sounds good on paper, but that doesn’t mean it will actually translate to ...



AMD Displays the Brightest Display Future I’ve Seen at CES 2016

4k is all the rage these days. Everyone is trying to get a single GPU to be able to play 60 FPS on a 4k display with modern titles. But what if I told you that you really don’t need 4k? You’d probably be asking me to show you the red and blue pills as well. The reality though is that in spite of all the 4k resolution displays and high definition VR experiences I saw, the thing that impressed me the most was a simple 1440p display that was absolutely gorgeous to look at. Oh, and I got to find out about some new CPUs and stock coolers as well. Let’s start out with this notion of unnecessary 4k resolution. There are two main details in display technology that are integral to a better viewing experience and I’m going to try to sum them up as basically as possible, with the understanding that I was able to muster. First, the display has to be manufactured as HDR. Simply put, it means that the display gives the widest range possible from lights and darks. OLED screens from visual impact productions are great at this because they can dim individual pixels, hence the “High Dynamic Range” (HDR), so darks and lights contrast well. Also, the TV has to be programmed to support HDR so that it can properly display it. If this sounds difficult, this technology is actually already part of numerous displays in production from companies like LG. However, there is one other key component. Most pixels are designed to create colors using the RGB spectrum, bu...





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