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Posts Tagged ‘amd’

GIGABYTE has a New 990FX Motherboard!?! GA-990FX-Gaming

UPDATE: As requested, here’s an update about the availability of the GA-990FX-Gaming since it just showed up for sale. Links below. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128886 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B019C3S2CS/ref=s9_simh_gw_g147_i1_r?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=desktop-1&pf_rd_r=0K6H28YZ47R31PRV6DY5&pf_rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=2079475242&pf_rd_i=desktop I spend far too much time scouring the internet for anything hardware related. As it is, I see a lot of comments from people asking why nobody is coming out with better FX series motherboards, especially with the 9590 having been out for quite some time now. To be fair to manufacturers, nobody wants to invest too much in a chipset that is on the verge of being obsolete. This makes what GIGABYTE is doing all the more confusing but I think I can shed some light on what’s really going on. Between certain supply issues and what amounts to a surprisingly high demand, GIGABYTE may be positioning themselves as a sole contender with the release of the GA-990FX-Gaming. First, let’s talk about what could be bringing this on. Both ASUS and GIGABYTE are experiencing about a 10% drop in their motherboard sales. Most of the time when this happens, everyone is quick to point out that desktops are going to fail and be replaced by the all-powerful tablet (seriously?). But there are other factors attributing to a possible rise with AMD, namely, Skylake. INTEL really missed the...



AMD has a Response to Gameworks with GPUOpen

We all want better graphics in games, but we like those improvements to not utterly destroy our framerates. We’re beginning a new era of PC gaming that is bringing better performance from a software side, rather than completely relying on GPU manufacturers to make beefier chips. NVIDIA GameWorks is an API released in 2014 that was not only supposed to give developers better hardware control, but also offer some rich features for better graphics in game. Unfortunately, the results led to some performance hits in various situations causing varied opinions of the benefit. Now AMD is finally responding with there own developer tool called GPUOpen. AMD seems to be stepping up their game big time and I think GPUOpen will end being a great thing for PC Gamers. As the name implies, GPUOpen is open source, which means there will be a lot more minds trying to optimize the features for performance, as well as being able to share the code without repercussion. This is a good way to bring developers on board with AMD, and should help with some of the disparity we’ve seen in performance from NVIDIA and AMD GPUs from certain game titles. The other interesting thing about GPUOpen is what it could mean for console ports. Radeon Tech is in just about every console right now, but particularly the XBox One and PS4. If the developer tool makes porting to PC that much easier, we may see more console exclusives make their way to PC since development costs can be a major detractor. S...



What does FinFET mean for Gamers?

There’s a ton of leaks and rumors circulating about the AMD Arctic Islands and NVIDIA Pascal GPUs slated to release next year. Right now, it’s hard to get too excited about anything. Don’t get me wrong, I believe the new releases are going to be phenomenal, but we’re so early before the release of these products that any actual performance numbers are still a long ways off. However, there are still a couple of pieces of information being leaked that are intriguing and quite frankly, should be getting gamers very excited about the games of 2017 and beyond. FinFET is a new process that helps shrink the size of the transistor to 14nm or 16nm. Both TSMC and Global Foundries have managed to get their processes mature enough that they can begin mass production shortly, but we still have to see how good the yields are for determining what the cost of the new GPUs will be. Since graphics cards have been stuck on the 28nm process for quite some time now, it makes sense that efficiency and performance are going to improve significantly. While AMD is claiming double the performance per watt, that can mean little until actual gaming performance is measured. Many times, that double per watt slogan can translate into something quite a bit less than what it sounds like. However, the other factor is the massive amount of transistors that can be squeezed into one die as a result of the shrink. The flagship chip should contain up to 18 billion transistors, over do...



AMD FreeSync is Advancing, Adding New Features

The evolution of AMD FreeSync AMD is enabling FreeSync support over HDMI in early 2016, making smooth gaming experiences more accessible to everyone. FreeSync through HDMI will be supported on all AMD APUs and GPUs that already support FreeSync via DisplayPort, and AMD is working with ecosystem partners including LG, Samsung and Acer to deliver FreeSync over HDMI-compatible displays. Potential use cases include: More affordable mainstream monitors, 70% of which lack a DisplayPort connector External monitors for notebooks with an HDMI port connected to FreeSync-ready Radeon graphics AMD is also introducing the first notebook with a validated AMD FreeSync panel, the Lenovo Y700, which is exclusively available from Best Buy USA starting at $899. The Lenovo Y700 features the AMD FX-8800P “Carrizo” APU and Radeon R9 M380 Graphics with a direct drive LCD display and a 40-60Hz dynamic refresh range. AMD and its partners have now announced or shipped 40 displays across the DisplayPort and HDMI interfaces, making AMD FreeSync the world’s foremost dynamic refresh technology by 2:1. High Dynamic Range (HDR) compatibility As consumers start to demand higher-quality monitors, HDR technology is emerging to set an excitingly high bar for overall display quality. HDR panels are characterized by: Brightness between 600-1200 cd/m2 of luminance, with an industry goal to reach 2000 Contrast ratios that closely mirror human visual sensitivity to contrast (SMPTE 2084) And the Rec.2020 col...



AMD Launches ‘Boltzmann Initiative’ to Dramatically Reduce Barriers to GPU Computing on AMD FirePro™ Graphics

AMD Launches ‘Boltzmann Initiative’ to Dramatically Reduce Barriers to GPU Computing on AMD FirePro™ Graphics New Tools Target an Unprecedented 28 Teraflops of Processing at Less Than a Kilowatt by 2016 AUSTIN, Texas 11/16/2015 Building on its strategic investments in heterogeneous system architecture (HSA), AMD (NASDAQ:AMD) announced a suite of tools designed to ease development of high-performance, energy efficient heterogeneous computing systems. The “Boltzmann Initiative” leverages HSA’s ability to harness both central processing units (CPU) and AMD FirePro™ graphics processing units (GPU) for maximum compute efficiency through software. The first results of the initiative are featured this week at SC15 and include the Heterogeneous Compute Compiler (HCC); a headless Linux® driver and HSA runtime infrastructure for cluster-class, High Performance Computing (HPC); and the Heterogeneous-compute Interface for Portability (HIP) tool for porting CUDA-based applications to a common C++ programming model. The tools are designed to drive application performance across markets ranging from machine learning to molecular dynamics, and from oil and gas to visual effects and computer-generated imaging. “AMD’s Heterogeneous-compute Interface for Portability enables performance portability for the HPC community. The ability to take code that was written for one architecture and transfer it to another architecture without a negative impact on per...



DirectX 12 is a Great Thing for AMD

And everyone for that matter! But let’s not harsh on my sacrifice of proper grammar for stylistic writing when we can focus on good things from DirectX 12. I’m a firm believer that by the end of next year, DirectX 12 and Vulcan are going to be taking the gaming world by storm. I got a chance to play around with Fable Legends and the graphics were down right amazing! Techspot recently did a comparison of DirectX 11 and 12 to show the FPS gain from a couple of different configurations in Ashes of the Singularity. While the improvements were nice overall, there were some particular gains with FX CPUs that I’ve been waiting to see for quite some time now. Let’s start with the bad news. DirectX 12 is not Bulldozer’s salvation. If anything DirectX 12 is the final nail in that coffin, in the sense that new architecture is long overdue. Shifting away from single-thread performance was never a good move. I still believe AMD was on the right track in that we needed to move to more utilization of multi-threading, especially in gaming, but that shouldn’t have been at the sacrifice of single-thread. Zen is looking to solve these issues, but these initial results are showing an 8350 struggling to keep up with an i3. Even though the i3 is later gen, we’re still talking about a low budget range CPU beating out an enthusiast one for gaming. Now that we got that out of the way though, let’s get on to the good news for AMD. We still have only o...



Why I think AMD is Turning it Around, and it’s not the Reason You’d Expect

Let’s face it. If you’re a full time news and editorial writer, then you want to cover every bit of info you can find without missing a beat. On the other hand, if you’re like me, then you have to balance your passion for computer hardware with a full time job, a wife, kids, and the other normal things that come your way. AMD has been pumping out some interesting news, but there hasn’t been enough concrete things that I could find the time to put enough thoughts together on. However, there are enough small things going on that I think it’s time to go over them. AMD seems to be heading in the right direction with their upcoming CPUs and GPUs, but there’s one thing that really caught my attention that encouraged me about Red’s potential to turn their fortunes around next year. Zen is the major thing everyone is hoping will bring AMD back from the brink. The new architecture combined with the new cache design seems to be showing a lot of promise. Nobody will argue with a 40% IPC gain and if the chips overclock decently, Zen could be a major win. Recently, news came out showing that the new design met AMD’s expectations and no serious bottleneck occurred in testing. This makes you wonder how much AMD knew about Bulldozer’s bottlenecks and how hard they tried to overlook them. With Global Foundries recently saying that their manufacturing process seems to be up and running, Zen looks like it’s going to be on track as w...



Not Upgrading to Skylake could be Worth the Wait

Some people out there don’t understand what waiting to upgrade means. The rest of us know that once we sink a few hundred dollars into a nice upgrade, we aren’t putting anything new in our computers for a while, possibly even years. Skylake has been a great release with the return to good overclocking and some amazing chipset features on the Z170 boards, but if you’re still on the fence about whether to upgrade or not, there could be one good reason to hold out for just another year. In case you haven’t noticed, memory is in a state of flux. You may be thinking that DDR4 isn’t that big of a deal, and you’d sort of be right. Where memory is making huge improvements is in graphics cards, storage and caches in CPUs. The ability to 3D stack memory chips on top of one another is revolutionizing the way typical computing handles various memory work loads by exponentially increasing bandwidth. In the case of Skylake, the architecture is doing a great job, but the CPU cache is made up of the same ole’ same ole’. Broadwell didn’t get as much attention as Skylake because on an enthusiast level, it was pretty difficult to overclock. However, Broadwell introduced us to 128 MB of eDram in the L4 cache. If the number doesn’t blow you away on it’s own (128 MB of L4 cache!!!), the fact that the i7 5775C outperforms the 6770K in gaming performance should be enough to get your attention and I’m not talking about the int...



What if I told you an R9 290X was competing with a GTX 980 Ti?

So, I’m browsing the internet trying to find out whether I should save some cash and go with the i5-6600K, or go all out with an i7-6700K. I already know that there won’t be much of a discernible difference with current games, but DirectX 12 games are on the horizon, I just got a beta invite to one such game, and there could be some performance to gain from the hyper-threading. I didn’t find the info I wanted, but I did find something astonishing. The GTX 980 Ti seems almost untouchable, but you can imagine my shock when I saw an R9 290X tying, and even beating the Maxwell behemoth in several benchmarks. Yesterday, I did a pretty heavy write-up on some Ashes of the Singularity benchmarks that surfaced about a week ago. It turns out, those weren’t the only ones done. Ars Technica decided to do a very comprehensive set of tests that involved comparing an old school R9 290X with a very state of the art GTX 980 Ti and pretty much showed the card matching the NVIDIA flagship on every turn. The 980 Ti still destroys AMD’s part in DirectX 11, but once we get to 12 we see a super competitive landscape. Here’s a couple patterns I noticed. The GTX card benefits slightly more from 6 cores and hyper-threading than the R9 card does at higher resolutions. The NVIDIA card also has a slight advantage with average framerates during the heavy scenes. An interesting thing that was happening was that once hyper-threading was disabled and the CPU was reduce...



Ashes of the Singularity Scaling: The AMD Crossroads

Last week, the new game, “Ashes of Singularity” had a pretty comprehensive scaling review performed with both DirectX 11 and DirectX 12. The results were interesting to say the least. Multiple CPUs were used to test both the R9 390X as well as the GTX 980. While AMD enjoyed some impressive gains, NVIDIA had some fairly lackluster results that even prompted the company to release statements for damage control. It would be very easy to say that AMD is making a comeback and NVIDIA is gonna be in trouble, but that would be too easy. How can we come to the proper conclusions about these results? Let me start off by saying that this is great news for AMD. It’s long been claimed that Radeon GPUs would be much better if the drivers could just utilize them properly. It seems this is almost true, but rather than drivers, it’s APIs that needed to take advantage of that hardware. However, I’m seeing some massive problems here that if AMD doesn’t quickly solve them, we can say goodbye to competition for a long time to come. I want to show you three conclusions that I saw from these results, and why I think there could be more bad news here than good if AMD doesn’t make some dramatic changes in the near future. (Click for Larger View) Let’s begin with the first big implication these AotS results are showing us. AMD needs to refocus their software development. This seems like something that is already in progress, but when we see what Direc...



Nixeus NX-VUE24 24″ FreeSync 144Hz Gaming Monitor Review

Introduction AMD FreeSync is a topic that has been buzzing around lately and has sparked some major debates over the web. While we’re not here to debate FreeSync over G-Sync and vise-versa, we are here to talk about what FreeSync can bring to the table. In recent years, we have been hearing about nVidia’s G-Sync technology and its benefits, and we have seen many rave reviews and tests with a G-Sync Monitor, but it seemed that AMD was left behind in this arena while nVidia seemed to have capitalized on the G-Sync Technology. However, with the recent technology advances from AMD’s graphics line up and the team up with VESA, we are now seeing AMD FreeSync displays and graphics cards showing up in the market, and we love to see competition. Not only does this leave room for a competitive market, but now this also gives AMD fans a hand in the technology. Although they don’t exactly perform the same way, they both have the same concept in mind. We will go over the AMD FreeSync technology in just a little bit. In the meantime… we bring you the new Nixeus 24″ FreeSync 144Hz Gaming Display review. The Nixeus brand is not as mainstream as some of the other popular brands like ASUS, BenQ or even Acer, but they are hitting the market strong with their new AMD FreeSync enabled display. We were one of the few lucky sites that were able to get our hands on an initial engineer sample of the Nixeus 24″ FreeSync 144Hz Gaming Display. This is our...



HIS R9 380 IceQ X2 Review

Today we're looking at the HIS R9 380 IceQ X2, a card that boasts a custom heatsink and a factory overclock, offering strong gaming values for consumers on a modest budget. With a reasonable price tag of $225, it sounds pretty good so far. Let's get this card on the bench and take a closer look.



Fury X Overclocking Failing to Meet Expectations

When Fury X first released, overclocking was abysmal, but that wasn’t any surprise once it was pointed out that voltage control wasn’t being supported yet. Now however, TechPowerUp seems to have found a breakthrough in the voltage control and plans on releasing software soon for other users. The bad news is, it doesn’t look like AMD understands the phrase “overclocker’s dream” when it comes to Fiji overclocking. To begin with, TechPowerUp was able to get a good 60 MHz extra out of the HBM. That isn’t a bad number considering how fresh the technology is and since AMD wasn’t bragging about memory overclocking, it’s a nice bonus. The problem is how little the GPU itself was able to be pushed. The most they could get out of it was an extra 165 MHz while remaining stable. When you do the math, that’s only slightly over a 15% overclock. The good news was that temperatures still remained great, but the power draw on the system raised exponentially. All considering, the extra energy needed only amounted to roughly a 5 FPS gain in gaming. Some minor tweaks in voltage would be fine if you wanted to reach stability but overall, there doesn’t seem to be a worthwhile benefit to pushing the Fury X to the max. Check out the link below to see the scaling in more detail. There’s really no way to spin this in a positive light. AMD really dropped the ball by claiming that Fury X would be a “overclocker’s d...



AMD Releases the A8-7670K APU

AMD has a new APU for us that looks like it will fit extremely well in a low budget gaming machine. Based on the slides, if you’re one of the many that is hopping on board to the ever growing MOBA genre, or just like to kill time on Roblox, then you may have found the perfect chip that won’t break the bank. Honestly, while I know many of us are just waiting for Zen, my only true complaint is how little we see these APUs in laptops. The reason I say this is I know plenty of kids who use their parents laptops for League of Legends, Minecraft and Roblox. If AMD could market chips like this as the perfect solution for the family laptop, especially since many families use the laptop as a slightly more mobile desktop anyways, I think they would be hitting the mark perfectly. As it is, this is still a very budget friendly solution for some decent gaming so check out the press release and slides below. New AMD A-Series Desktop Processors: Smart Choice for Everyday Computing, Powerful eSports Engine and Ready for Windows® 10 — New AMD A8-7670K APU delivers an excellent experience and value for today’s modern workloads and Microsoft® Windows® 10 support — SUNNYVALE, Calif. — July 20, 2015 — AMD (NASDAQ: AMD), the company whose technology helps power the Microsoft® Xbox One™ and the Sony® PlayStation 4™, today introduced the newest addition to its A-Series line of desktop processors. The A8-7670K APU provides a superb experience for Microsoft Windows 10...



The R9 Fury Just Released, Here’s a List of Reviews

AMD just released the little brother to the R9 Fury X, the R9 Fury, which means the reviews are starting to flow in. A while back I had mentioned that it was possible Fury, rather than Fury X, was going to be the card to own. Based on what I’m seeing, it looks like it’s the more competitive card. The performance of this cut-down version of Fiji is much better in comparison to the GTX 980, however there are some particulars in the reviews that not only need to be properly tested, but cleared up as well. The big issue with Fury right now is the huge lack of voltage control. Overclocking is extremely handicapped right now until software starts supporting power adjustment. The problem is, this is leading some reviews to say that there is no voltage control. Granted, news could still come out that voltage regulation isn’t possible, but that is highly unlikely since announcements have been made from programmers explaining the difficulties and reasons for the delays. The other issue that shows up in overclocking is the repeated statement that HBM can’t be overclocked. While AMD did give us that impression, WCCFTech uncovered some news that someone legitimately overclocked the HBM. The contradiction here makes sense when you think of how new the technology is. In theory, HBM should be a prime candidate for overclocking, but due to the freshness of the design, AMD can’t afford to be responsible for memory modules blowing out if it is revealed that ...






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