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AMD Athlon X4 845 Review

Introduction Everyone may be waiting for Zen, but that doesn’t mean AMD doesn’t have a few more releases up their sleeves before the end of the year. The Athlon X4 845 is the latest budget minded chip to help pass the time until their new architecture arrives. What’s nice about the 845 is the fact that it uses the latest Excavator cores instead of the Steamroller ones. AMD designed the Carrizo architecture to put an emphasis on power efficiency, but ever since the backlash from Zambezi, single-thread performance is one of the first things people look for with new releases. We’ll certainly check that out but there’s something else that really needs to be pointed out in AMD’s new design choices. The stock cooler is the bane of CPU existence. They’re SOOO bad! With all that noise, inefficient cooling, as well as cheap designs, many feel like their hard earned dollars are slightly wasted with such skimpy designs. AMD is trying to change that by redesigning all of their stock coolers. Pure Overclock already got to check out the Wraith cooler and it was a hit. Now, we’ll get to also see how AMD’s lowest budget cooler performs as well. If Zen manages to complete the direction AMD is on, there is no doubt they will start changing the market in good ways. We’ll see how the Athlon X4 845 measures up, but before we do that, let’s take a quick word from team Red themselves. At AMD, we live our core values through our ac...



AMD FX-9590 Overclocked Review

Introduction Back in 2013, AMD released a chip that had many scratching their heads. Between the abnormally high TDP and ridiculous price tag, everyone thought the company had lost their minds. In hind sight, it’s easy to see that AMD hadn’t found their new direction yet, and they were ensuring that a chip of this magnitude could be successfully handled in a consumer market. The good news about the 9590 is, in spite of being considered a failed launch, it still worked out to be a decent chip and it certainly opened the door for future releases with high TDPs. Energy efficiency kind of gets thrown out the window with overclocking, and an ultra-enthusiast version of Zen is something I would certainly look forward to today. Having followed this release for years now, the biggest thing that bugged me was only getting to see the limitations of the chip tested on 240mm AIOs. The question on my mind was, “Could someone get reasonably past the 5.0 GHz barrier if they had some uber cooling?” AMD was kind enough to send a sample my way and let me have a go at it. To be clear here, this isn’t just trying to reach 5.o GHz and run a couple of tests. The real test of the 5.0 barrier is if a user could run that as a 24/7 clock speed, and be able to do so with a fairly easily involving just a multiplier changes. With that in mind, let’s begin looking into how the experience went, the results of the tests, and just how worth it a 9590 would be for the ...



AMD’s new Wraith Cooler and a SURPRISE!

Introduction It’s always nice to receive a surprise in the mail, especially the kind where you were expecting one thing, and got so much more. AMD managed to surprise me in this way this January! As it happens, Josh (in the normal course of things), throws out to the reviewer pool opportunities to review the odd piece of hardware that a vendor has offered to let us review here at PureOC. People volunteer, and through some magic, Josh picks a reviewer. In this case, the hardware in question was a low profile cooler called “The Wraith Cooler” from AMD. I suppose I should have realized that this was AMD specific hardware given the manufacturer, but I’ll be honest, I saw low-profile, nearly silent, and thought “Me! Me! Me!” and threw my proverbial hat into the review ring. Josh cast his magic spell, shook his magic 8 ball, or whatever, and I received the nod. Joy! Color me excited! I’m going to get to review a low profile cooler! My thoughts immediately shift to the planning stage, and off I go. Now, keep in mind the Northeast had been snowed in for a few days, and packages had been delayed. So this gave me plenty of time to consider my approach. I’d open up the Pandora containing my i5, remove the Noctua low profile cooler, and install the Wraith, and then do some comparatives. Easy. And the Wraith sounded kinda sexy too. I Love the Noctua, but the fans… that beige and brown theme just isn’t my favorite… So. I ...



AMD FX-8370 & FX-8370E Processor Review

  Introduction   We all know the woes AMD and their fans have been dealing with over the last few years so we will not be hashing that topic again. We will instead focus on the updated line for what they are, a place holder. They are designed to hold the interest of fans, budget shoppers and gamers until further notice. There have been no grand design changes that will suddenly put AMD on top of the performance heap. Instead, this is a product to cover those that have yet to make the switch from an older AM3 or AM3+ CPU or even a lesser CPU in the current AM3+ product stack. There is also a shift in how the FX series chips line up to the competition. We will move right into the overview and benchmarks that cover the new FX-8370 and FX-8370E 8 core CPUs.   Press Release   Introducing AMD FX Optimized for Power and Efficiency Multi-core processing is the future. Game engines are being designed to do more at a time; particle effects, physics calculations, light rays, and shadows are growing progressively more complex by the day. Large-scale computing now relies more on the overall throughput of parallelism than the singular speed of CPU cores. Today, AMD FX-Series CPUs return to push the boundaries of value to the high-performance desktop platform – introducing the speed-optimized 125W AMD FX-8370 and power-optimized 95W AMD FX-8370E and AMD FX-8320E processors. Featuring the “Piledriver” x86 core architecture, all of our new FX solutions feature...



 
 
 
 
 

AMD A10-6700 & MSI FM2-A85XMA-E35 Motherboard Review

The new AMD Richland processors were released just over a week ago. AMD first launched its A-series processors just over 2 years ago as the Fusion technology with the "Llano" series. During its first launch and introduction to this APU series chip, no one was really sure how well this platform was going to perform. Over the course of a few years, we have seen AMD improve on its one of a kind platform with its first revision "Trinity" and we now have the next release "Richland." During its first revision, Trinity, we saw a change in socket from FM1 to FM2 along with a revision to its chipset. However, with Richland, we are glad to see that AMD decided to stick to its FM2 based socket. Today, we have the AMD A10-6700 processor at hand to put to the test.



 
 
 
 
 

AMD “Richland” A-Series A10-6800K

In 2011 when AMD first launched its new fusion technology processors, there were many questions with its performance to value ratio. This new APU series was the first of its kind, and no one was sure how well it would develop in the consumer world. However, over the last few years, we have seen AMD improve this platform with the release of its "Trinity" processing power and the APU series has grown to be a leading performer with this unique platform. The AMD APU series combines the CPU and GPU under one processing unit providing great computing prowess while fitting in consumers' budgets. Today, we are going to be previewing a new advancement level with this technology. AMD has taken the FM2 based socket and its improved "Piledriver" Cores to the next level. With the improved emphasis on performance, we can't wait to dive in and put this new AMD A-Series A10-6800k to the test.





 
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