Pureoverclock: PC Hardware reviews and news for overclockers!

 

Review
Chromax

Noctua industrialPPC 24V Fans and Chromax Accessories Review

Introduction Typically, nobody is supposed to run a piece of hardware outside of the way that it was intended to run. Of course, we make exceptions because we love to overclock things and see how much extra performance there is to be gained. So it may seem a bit strange to review something and only give it half of what it’s capable of. When you consider that the goal is silence in cooling, then it begins to make sense. NOCTUA just released a new series of industrialPPC fans that rate at 24V. While this can be useful for high end server environments that don’t care about noise as much, the benefit for everyday consumers is at 12V, the fans will run more silently while hopefully giving decent air flow. We’ll find out how well they do, but there’s one more huge thing that consumers have been waiting eons for. COLORS!!! That’s right. NOCTUA is finally giving consumers a broad range of colors to customize their fans beyond brown or beige (I suppose there were those grey colors too). Personally, all it took for me to fall in love with a NOCTUA fan was to see how it performed in person, but I totally understand people who don’t go in on one of them because of the color scheme. Now there are Chromax accessories that allow the user to customize each fan to have a splash of color that matches a build better, while still having the professional look that comes from having a NOCTUA fan over a flashy LED fan. We’ll see how those look in a b...
samsung_fit_7

Samsung USB 3.0 16GB and FIT 32GB Review

Samsung is targeting mobile users who want both capacity and durability in a very small form factor. Today we're looking at the Samsung 16GB and FIT 32GB USB 3.0 flash drives. They promise very quick speeds for mainstream consumers and professionals alike, so let's take a closer look at what these tiny drives have to offer.
H110i_GTX_02

Corsair H110i GTX Review

Introduction Who says reviews have to be 100% serious all the time? With the time of the year being what it is, I decided to have a little fun with the video portion of the review. This could be the first and last time you get to see a star ship captain explore the finer details of a PC component. We hope you enjoy the video, but let’s go ahead and jump into the written review of this Corsair unit. Corsair has been known for making silent CLC units. They usually sacrifice pump and fan speed to avoid some noise, but at the same time their units have managed to stay pretty high on the performance pile. Recently, however, the competition has been working harder and Corsair has had to start making units that could offer better performance over raw silence. This is where the GT and GTX line of coolers are coming from. The Corsair H110i GTX is trying to offer the best performance of any CLC on the market. Will it succeed? We’ll try and find out how well this unit measures up, but before we begin, let’s hear a brief word from Corsair themselves. Founded in 1994, Corsair has grown from pioneering the high-performance DRAM market to one of the world’s leading providers of enthusiast-grade PC components and peripherals. Our groundbreaking technology and innovation can be found in our high-performance memory, ultra-efficient power supplies, PC cases, PC and CPU cooling solutions, and solid-state storage devices. Under the Corsair Gaming brand, launched in 2014, w...
Noctua NH-L9 (5)

Noctua NH-L9x65 Review

Introduction Noctua is renowned for their silent performance, but lately we’ve been seeing more products that fit into the small form-factor HTPC market over the ultra-enthusiasts monster performance market. This no doubt indicates a shift in less desire for the newest high end products and more demand for parts that “get the job done.” The NH-L9x65 is one such product. Here, Noctua is introducing a very nice, low-profile CPU cooler that fits the bill entirely for keeping an ITX style computer cool in it’s constrained case space. We know Noctua can make great coolers, but now we’ll see how well this small cooler stacks up. We’ll be finding out soon enough but before we start taking a closer look, let’s pause for a brief statement about who Noctua is and what they are passionate about.
mionix_castor_11

Mionix Castor Gaming Mouse

Introduction We’ve seen several mice from Swedish company Mionix, and we’ve been impressed. The Naos remains one of the most comfortable mice I’ve ever grasped (admittedly, it’s my go-to daily mouse of choice), and we’ve seen models from Mionix that sport minor differences and improvements along the way. Why mess with a winning formula, it seems. One of the differences is certainly in terms of cost. It should come as no surprise that everyone doesn’t necessarily want to splurge for the flagship Naos, and for those who want the quality and features but a more affordable price tag, the Mionix Castor is what we’re looking at today. The Castor is a right-handed mouse, and while it captures the shapely essence of the vaunted Naos, it also seems to share some lineage from the impressive Avior, creating a subtle new shape that’s suitable for palm, claw, and fingertip-grip preferences. There are a couple other differences, such as a 10,000 DPI optical engine rather than laser, a simplified lighting and feature set, and a lower price tag than the premium Naos or Avior. Sounds good so far. Let’s take a closer look at the Mionix Castor and find out if it’s worthy your consideration.
BothBoxes

ADATA XPG SX930 240GB and Premier SP550 240GB SSD Review

Introduction Over the course of the last few weeks, a couple of anonymous brown boxes showed up on my doorstep. Festooned with foreign post marks, they set the household atwitter with speculation as to what might be contained within. I’m not sure the rest of the residents appreciated the contents quite as much as I, but for my part, I was ecstatic to open them and find both an XPG SX930 “Gaming SSD” and the more mainstream Premier SP550 from ADATA nestled among the packing material. Before we move on, let’s think about that a bit. Not so very long ago in late 2009, I purchased my first SSD. A 128GB Patriot Torqx SSD that I paid $369 for. Performance was rated at a paltry 260MB/s sequential read and 180MB/s sequential write. TRIM wasn’t implemented on that particular Indilinx Barefoot controller (I’m not sure it was even invented yet), and it ran on a SATA II interface (1.5GBps) of which it was at no risk of saturating. There were no categories in SSD’s. No “Gaming”, “Performance”, “Premium” or any other label. SSD was a self contained category all on its own. (For a bit of historic perspective, you can read Jake’s review of the Patriot Torqx 128GB SSD here). Today, our SATA based SSD’s saturate a 6 Gbps SATA III bus, and an ADATA Premier SP550 costs a mere $79 on Newegg for just about twice the capacity and more than double the performance of my now Vintage Torqx. In those days the d...


 
Newly Reviewed
 
  • IMG_8263
  • IMG_6970
  • IMG_2821
  • featured image
  • csaz-103-topbanner
  • 2014092411000215-14s
  • Closer Look 1
  • silence
 

Find us on Google+