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Tuniq Potency 750w

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Posted February 22, 2009 by Jake in Cases & PSU

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by Jake
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Exterior

The Potency 750w unit itself is coated in a black, semi-gloss finish, continuing the straightfoward theme from the box and packaging. It certainly isn’t ostentatious and doesn’t have any flash to speak of, so if you’re in the market for some major "bling" then you should look elsewhere. It does look good though, it’s neither a black mirrored finish, nor a flat matte either; it sits comfortably in the middle, looking slightly conservative but somewhat sleek nonetheless.

The finish on the Potency 750w is quite smooth, so you’ll have a bit of an issue with fingerprints, though nothing major like a mirrored finish. Additionally, the finish looks to be rather scratch-resistant, as I did give it a couple whacks with a screwdriver to test it out. This may not be the wisest move, but I’ve done it so you don’t have to. Thankfully, it came away completely unscathed and not a mark at all.

Highslide JS

Tuniq Potency 750w
Highslide JS

Tuniq Potency 750w
Highslide JS

Tuniq Potency 750w
Highslide JS

Tuniq Potency 750w

The Potency is not modular, instead going with a more traditional setup with all the cables attached directly to the unit. This is a bit surprising, as a 750w unit can be considered more high-end, and a modular setup is becoming the norm in this market segment. The cable connectors cover most high-end setup needs, those for SLI and CrossFire, including 2 – 6+2-pin connectors needed for the latest high-end graphics cards. The difference here, though, as compared to some other units we’ve seen lately, is there are not separate cables for each of the 4 input PCI-e connectors; rather, there are 2 cables in a 2+2 configuration, as shown below. This does cut down on the amount of cables, particulary important in a non-modular setup, but the design isn’t as robust as a result either.

The issue here, however, is the length of the cables, particularly the 4/8-pin ATX cable; it’s at least 1 inch too short. In mid-tower cases that have a bottom-mounted power supply, the 8-pin cable isn’t quite long enough to route behind the motherboard tray. The means that you’re left with cabling it in front of your graphics card, and it’s a rather tight squeeze. If, however, you have a full tower case, then you’ll be in worse shape. Cases with bottom-mounted power supplies are far more popular these days, so Sunbeamtech should consider lengthening the cables, but particularly the ATX one by at least 1 inch, and preferably 2 inches.

Another little nuisance is that the 20+4 pin connector doesn’t have any sort of little clip to keep them together. There are 2 little arrow graphics to show how to line them up in the proper direction, but once the cables are inserted into the motherboard, the 4-pin add-on could be easily removed. A simple plastic hook would solve the problem, ensuring that the 4-pin stays married to the 20-pin and doesn’t accidentally work itself loose.

Highslide JS

Tuniq Potency 750w
Highslide JS

Tuniq Potency 750w

Looking at the specifications we see that the Potency 750w has 4 +12V rails, each rated at 18A, for a total of 650w. This should be adequate for most enthusiast setups unless you’re going with a quad SLI/CrossFire setup. The rear of the unit features honeycombed perforations to allow for increased airflow from the fan to exhaust the hot air out the rear of your case.  We also see the unit’s specifications. Overall the Potency 750w looks rather nice and is quite weighty, always a good sign.

Let’s open up the Potency and see what we have inside.

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