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Thermaltake Element G

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Posted August 4, 2009 by Jake in Cases & PSU

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by Jake
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Exterior

The exterior of the Element G is designed with a black, matte steel finish accented by red highlights that have been used rather minimally. Ironically, without turning on the multi-coloured fans (more on that very soon) the Element G is rather sleek and understated in terms of aesthetics, which is an exercise in polar opposites from what the case looks like with the lighting turned on. In any event, it would seem that Thermaltake has toned down any sort of brash approach on the exterior (lighting notwithstanding) that is often the norm for gamer cases, instead opting to exercise some restraint here to appeal to the "professional" crowd. We’re not exactly sure what "professional" means in this instance: professional gamer? Professional animator? Either way, the overall aesthetic here does look very tasteful and refined, while still maintaining a rather contemporary and fresh look. The Element G appears to achieve a successful blend of stylish modernism and contemporary restraint, indicating so far a clean setup that is equal parts form and function.

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Thermaltake Element G
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Thermaltake Element G
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Thermaltake Element G
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Thermaltake Element G

Unlike some of Thermaltake’s other towers that have multiple models available, there is only one available with the Element G: one with a solid side panel and a massive 230mm intake fan. It would stand to reason that the huge side intake fan would appeal to the gamer crowd to help cool the hot graphics cards, often two or more, though again we’re left scratching our heads if this somehow reinforces the notion that the Element G can be for "professionals" and not just simply the "gamer crowd". Regardless, the side fan isn’t exclusively the domain of gamers, and could be used by any consumer that wants to take advantage of the increased airflow offered by the Element G, as it’s been our experience that a side intake fan (particularly a large one such as this) significantly lowers graphic card temperatures, and can also help the overall internal temperatures as well.

The front of the Element G lacks any sort of door that we saw on their Element S tower, though there is a fully-meshed front bezel that runs the entire height of the case.  This will certainly help with ventilation and airflow into the case.  There are dust filters inside the bezel, easy to remove and clean.  The front bezel incorporates one large 200mm intake fan, located in front of the hard drives, aiding to help cool the hard drives as it pushes cooler air from the front and across the drives, to toward the rear. The three 5.25" bays should be sufficient for most people, likely for a DVD writer, Blu-Ray drive, and perhaps a fan controller.

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Thermaltake Element G
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Thermaltake Element G

Along the top of the case, the Element G sports a large 200mm exhaust fan that does emanate a soft LED light when powered on. Running at only 800rpm, it should be very quiet while still moving a great volume of air out of the case, particularly near the CPU and MOFSET area. The top also features in the standard I/O connectors (unfortunately there isn’t any e-SATA here) near the front in a slimly recessed area that is flush with the door face. At the rear we see a standard layout, with a bottom-mounted power supply and a honeycombed 120mm fan exhaust that is stamped and integral to the chassis, a bit more restrictive than an actual fan guard. The interesting feature to note here are the two 60mm exhaust fans that have been installed adjacent to the expansion slots.

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Thermaltake Element G
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Thermaltake Element G
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Thermaltake Element G
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Thermaltake Element G

A good feature on the side panel and fan is that there aren’t any exposed wires to power the fan; in fact, there is a small contact point that engages the power only when the panel is fully installed. This not only reduces the clutter of wires but more importantly prevent any accidents if for some reason you decide to remove the panel with the power on (presumably to check things out). This is an excellent design move by Thermaltake, and really sets the bar high for case design. It’s a small but very important detail.

Let’s move on to the interior.

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