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ThermalTake Core X2 Chassis Review

4
Posted January 4, 2015 by Sandy Bruce in Cases & PSU

Overview

Hardware:
 
Manufacturer:
 
Release Date: Now 01/2015
 
Price at time of Review: 99.99 - Core X1 129.99 - Core X2 169.99 - Core X3
 

WHAT WE LIKED:

Modular, Liquid Cooling Support, Roomy, Price, board platform, hidden drive bays, large window, Air cooling
 

WHAT WE DISLIKED:

Paint chipped at mounting points, non magnetic filters
 
BOTTOM LINE:
Overall Thermaltake has brought the features and expandability found in some of the more expensive chassis to the masses. If you can't afford something it really does not matter how much wear and tear it can withstand over time. Thanks to the Core X more people may be able to enter the world of extreme liquid cooling and custom modification.
by Sandy Bruce
Full Article
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Conclusion

I prefer to review a product based on its own merits but in this particular instance I find it impossible not to offer some sort of comparison because many others will say it anyways. The boxy shape and basic internal framework lines up to another modular chassis that is a favorite amongst the modding and custom cooling community. However the Core X2 is not made from the premium heavy gauge aluminum found in Case Labs chassis. The benefit of using heavier gauge material is rigidity and the ability to withstand abuse over long periods of time. This extra level comes with a huge jump in sticker price. With the X2 coming in at reasonable a $129.99 you see there really isn’t a comparison at all because that thicker material can run up past four times this amount. Three or four of X2’s could be purchased with that amount for some serious stacking! A boxy computer case is really the only comparison that can be made.

corex2

For the Core X series to be incredibly simple looking it is very versatile. The complete modular nature makes the X2 a canvas for an individual to create a personal work of art. Limitations are few and possibilities are a plenty. The biggest change vs. a conventional case is the orientation of the board tray. The platform opens up another plane for cooling solution installations and easier cable management. The Thermaltake Urban series of cases were for liquid cooling support in a gamer case. The Core X series is for extreme liquid cooling and modding that just happens to house a GPU for gaming.

IMG_2640

A small complaint would be the paint chipping I discovered when tearing down the internals. It looks like this could be from being assembled before the paint was 100% dry. Small and mostly insignificant but still an unfortunate mar even before I got to install the first part. I also wish the filters were all magnetic since the two on the mesh side cover were so easy to remove. Again small and largely insignificant as it is a mater of preference.

Overall Thermaltake has brought the features and expandability found in some of the more expensive chassis to the masses. If you can’t afford something it really does not matter how much wear and tear it can withstand over time. The MSRP of Core X1,X2 and X3 is $99, $129 and$169 respectively. More people may be able to enter the world of extreme liquid cooling and custom modification thanks to the Core X series price points. Of course these gains don’t come without trade offs but they are reasonable and expected trade offs when compared to cases that are prohibitively expensive to most. I am having trouble thinking of any case that offers these features and support at the above price points.

Modularity, versatility, customizable, simple styling, stack-able, massive liquid cooling support at a reasonable price of $129.99 should garner the ThermalTake Core X series wide adoption with all walks of the custom building world. Can’t wait to see what people do with the Pure Overclock Editors Choice winning Core X2 and its siblings the Core X1 and X9.

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4 Comments


  1.  
    Lee

    Hi,
    nice review, im thinking of getting this or the X9, but theres one deciding factor: whilst you had this for a review, did you at all try a full atx board on the tray ? Im aware supported formats don’t include full ATX, however looking at dimensions it looks like a full board could fit.

    thanks




    •  
      Sandy Bruce

      I am pleased to hear you enjoyed the review. The X2 and X9 are a great platform to build in. Which ever you decide, I am sure you will be just as pleased as I was. As for the Full Size ATX testing, no I did not attempt to install one. The orientation of the board would have the bottom section of the board extending out past the side cover placement. I guess you could install one if you were not planning on using a side cover. The tail end of the board would also sag without having proper support. Go ahead and pickup the X9 for ATX and EATX support and save yourself the head ache. Also gives you more room for Liquid cooling components.




  2.  
    Lee

    Thanks for the response. I did sort of come to that conclusion by comparing board pics with the ones in your review, but wasn’t sure if something could be done. I already have an Asus Maximus Ranger for the build so I guess I will be using the X9, I had planned on 2 loops for this build, at least there will be growing space!




  3.  
    Sandy Bruce

    Sounds like the start of a really nice project. Feel free to add a build log on the forum in the “Work Log” section. If I had the time I would start over with this one and really make it shine. Only had a few days to get review up for launch.





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