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G.Skill Ripjaws X 8GB DDR3-1866

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Posted August 3, 2011 by Jake in RAM

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by Jake
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Overclocking

Before we continue onto the results, there are a few fundamentally critical points to first discuss about the Socket 1155 platform that has changed the way memory kits are used and tested.

First, the memory multipliers on P67 motherboards essentially top out at 2133MHz for selected speeds. This why we are seeing memory kits being released up to this particular speed. Lower speeds such as 1600MHz will work just fine, but will limit you from achieving top performance because of the changes in overclocking.

Since the CPU multiplier now essentially controls and limits overclocking, the motherboard’s bus (BCLK) extremely limited wiggle room. Unlike previous sockets and chipsets that allowed considerable increases in BCLK for overclocking and therefore higher memory speeds, P67/Z68 and Sandy Bridge doesn’t. What this means is that memory overclocking is now essentially unnecessary. Boosting the memory speeds by boosting the bus is no longer possible.

So, the only way to "overclock" memory to any meaningful degree with P67/Z68 motherboards is for the modules to be able to run at one speed level higher than its rated speed. For example, a 1600MHz could run at 1866MHz, while 1866MHz sticks could run at 2133MHz. As a result, our overclocking tests are now limited to seeing if that can happen.

Can the 8GB Ripjaws X DDR3-1866 run at 2133MHz? Let’s see below:

Indeed these modules have enough overclocking headroom available to run a speed level higher than their rating. Essentially you’re getting a freebie here, with a higher rated speed for no extra charge. We love that.

With that out of the way, we benchmarked these sticks at various speeds. Unfortunately, 1866MHz is a bit of an uncommon speed these days, so we don’t have any direct competition at this same speed, but we decided to see what results would be achieved nonetheless on their own merit.

Let’s look at the test results now.

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One Comment


  1.  
    adrian

    mine wont go that smooth, even raised voltage and upper the timings but no go. i guess you just have to get lucky:)





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