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EWin Hero Series HRD Gaming Chair Review

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Posted July 3, 2017 by Mario Campos in Peripherals

Overview

Hardware:
 
Manufacturer:
 
Price at time of Review: $359
 

WHAT WE LIKED:

High density memory foam, more than average height adjustment, slim lumbar pillow, sturdy metal frame and base, 155 degree recline, well packaged and easily assembled.
 

WHAT WE DISLIKED:

Price is a little steep, embroidery frays over time, plastic bar hits your head when fully reclined without pillows, this model lacks additional armrest adjustments,
 
BOTTOM LINE:
A well designed chair with negligible faults, but the price is currently at a place where you may be better off with either a less expensive model with similar features or pay a little more for an upgrade.
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by Mario Campos
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Unboxing and Assembly

I gently place the box on the ground. With swift determination I flip out my trusty knife to open the box. But what is this!? “Do Not Cut” written beneath a warning of attention. Undeterred, my Christmas Day repertoire of exhuming skills unleash upon the cardboard prison… and wow is there a lot of tape.

I’m assuming that “Do Not Cut” is mostly placed in effort to prevent someone from opening it with the knife pointed directly downward. It wouldn’t have mattered, however, as the first object in the upright position is the steel five point base. In the instance you are opening this box with a Crocodile Dundee knife, you knew what you were getting into. The chair back cushioned the center while the base and box of parts were cleverly positioned at the bottom. Being the lowest layer wasn’t the clever part so much as the box of smaller parts was pushing the seat against the opposite side of the box.

The other two sides of the box were supported by the armrests. Why is any of this important? I found out last time I opened one of these chairs that anything fragile really shouldn’t be in contact with any side of the box. Nothing was touching the sides of the box that couldn’t take a hit. The plastic facades on the hinge of the chair are buffered from the sides of the box by the armrests. Worst case scenario would be someone hitting the exact location of the facades on the bottom of the box or someone dropping it fiercely, but even then those hinge covers have at least a centimeter between them and the cardboard surface because of the seat. A dumb thing to be excited about and I don’t regret it. People need to know they should test their shipping containers.

If I had a criticism with packaging, it would probably be the location of the instructions. While the small part box is the obvious choice, taking inventory of the parts would be easier if you had the list when you opened the box. Along with the invoice of parts is a checklist of warnings and precautionary steps to take before assembly. Again, something we might want to know before we start taking parts out.

Assembly was simple enough. I appreciate that the majority of the screws were in the holes that you were going to place them already. Unscrew the back rest bolts, place on seat, put the bolts back in. Unscrew four base screws, place metal chair lift bracket, put the screws back in. There were only two, though it said there should be three, screws that came in a bag. No screwdrivers were needed, either. All of the screws had hex heads that you placed with the included Allen wrenches. The only difficult part of the build was the same problem with every gaming chair: attaching the seat and the back rest together. Maybe I need to assemble more chairs because that step always gets me. I feel like that is the one step that might require two people. I swear I’m doing it wrong every time.

Weirdest included item? Microfiber gloves.

As Josh pointed out, “I would love some microfiber gloves for handling these full glass PC cases, but why do you need them with a chair?” Are you displaying the chair for an event? You’ll probably want those gloves to keep all the greasy hand stains off of it. Are you going to use the chair? You’ll probably get greasy hand stains on it. Or at least I will. Doritos, tacos, sweaty game palms, head, back, french fries, and every greasy thing you can imagine will eventually touch this chair. Those stains also don’t tend to linger. Much like purposefully making a scratch on a metal plated apple device, assume people will have their grimy hands on your chair.

In the end, casters are still awkward to push down and it is awfully nice to sit in any chair after you assemble it.

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