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Evercool HPK-10025EA

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Posted November 8, 2009 by Jake in Cooling

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by Jake
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Closer Look, Installation

A tradtional tower design, the Evercool HPK-10025EA is eerily similar to the Evercool Buffalo we previously reviewed, with one glaring difference: this cooler is a top-down style (rotated 90 degrees) whereas the Buffalo cooler is a tower-style (upright). Normally we’ve seen during our extensive testing that top-down coolers are not as efficient as upright ones, but the advantage is they can fit very low-profile conditions, say, in a small LANbox and smallform case.

The overall design and look of the HPK-10025EA is rather sharp; it’s got a bit of flash with the red and black colour scheme without being overdone and ostentatious. The fan is coloured red, adding a nice accent to the cooler. We think it would look right at home in a windowed case that features a red lighting scheme. As for the size of the HPK-10025EA, it is extremely compact, probably the smallest and slimmest LGA1366 cooler we’ve seen to date, and will easily fit into any mid- or micro-tower case. It will be interesting to see of the small size and surface area of the fins will adversely affect its cooling ability.

Highslide JS

Evercool HPK-10025EA
Highslide JSEvercool HPK-10025EA

The Evercool HPK-10025EA features four heatpipes made from copper that help transfer the large quantity of heat which the CPU produces, but they emanate from the base itself rather than wrapping through the base and directly touching the CPU, as we’ve seen with some recent HDT coolers with that technology. The difference with a top-down cooler here is that the heatpipes cannot continue through the other side like tower-style coolers, so some cooling efficiency is lost. We suspect the 10025EA will be no different, and we’ll see during testing.

The cooling fins are not very tightly spaced, nor are they dimpled or angled like we’ve seen on some other models, so the HPK-10025EA’s fin design is neither problematic nor unique. The cooler is not very heavy, and with its diminutive size it’s definitely lighter than most other tower-style coolers we’ve seen. The overall size, designed to accommodate a 100mm fan instead of a larger 120mm also reduces the weight, making the HPK-10025EA a perfectly-sized cooler for smaller setups, coming in at a extremely lightweight 320g in total.

Highslide JS

Evercool HPK-10025EA
Highslide JSEvercool HPK-10025EA

Looking at the contact area at the bottom, we see the surface at the contact point for the CPU. The base is machined with a decent finish, nothing spectacular, and not surprising given the inexpensive cost of the HPK-10025EA.

Highslide JS

Evercool HPK-10025EA
Highslide JSEvercool HPK-10025EA

The HPK-10025EA is not a top-end enthusiast cooler designed for your big overclocks, and it does not have the price tag associated with such products either. Rather, it is a compact and affordable products, designed for more "mainstream" usage moderate performance systems; a quiet and inexpensive solution. Due to the very slim design and space created around the base and the heatsink itself, there is far more room to maneuver your fingers or hand into place to get the pins pushed down than on larger heatsinks which would inevitably lead to cut knuckles and plenty of cuss words.

Installation of the HPK-10025EA is fairly straightforward, and left no visible marks on my knuckles, though I must admit that the edges of the fins are slightly sharp, so careful of that. The cooler was installed so the fan was situated next to the memory modules.

Highslide JS

Evercool HPK-10025EA
Highslide JSEvercool HPK-10025EA

Since there is more space available than larger tower-style coolers when installing the HPK-10025EA has no issues with clearance, even with memory modules that have tall heatsinks.

Let’s move onto testing.

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