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CoolIT Domino A.L.C.

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Posted December 29, 2008 by Jake in Cooling

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by Jake
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Domino Up Close

This main housing of the device is made of a hard plastic. The color is a dark grey and is definitely not as cute as Kiera Knightley.  But we don’t care about cute we want to make sure this thing is tough and can perform. CoolIT did a nice job making a quality product, as the unit feels solid, the fittings all appear very tight, and no creaking or loose components.   In your case it will very sleek, assuming you have a clear side window.  If not, then unfortunately you’re out of luck.  I suppose it would have been perfect if the unit had a 5.25” display bay (even an optional one that could be purchased as an add-on), but as it is, the display works very well and is easily readable and clear; it does look great.  Black corrugated tubing is used to help avoid any kinks that could potentially damage the unit or cause performance issues.

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CoolIT Domino A.L.C.
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CoolIT Domino A.L.C.
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CoolIT Domino A.L.C.
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CoolIT Domino A.L.C.

The three levels of speed of operation for the Domino: Quiet, Performance, and Full Performance. Thankfully you have the option to change the level of cooling on your processor depending on the stress you’re putting on it.  So, assume you’re really pushing your computer and want to extract maximum performance from the processor….then you would use Performance Mode which will operate the fan at full speed (~2550RPM). On the other end of the Domino’s spectrum, let’s say you’re listening to some music and writing an essay, and your CPU is not being stressed….then run it on Quiet Mode where the fan only spins around 1030RPM to offer a quieter operation that will still provide good temperatures.  Finally, you could use the middle (Performance) setting which will allow you to dissipate a good amount of heat but will provide a quieter operation than the full setting, and is likely a good balance between performance and noise levels.

On the back you will note the standard radiator, cooled by a 120mm fan which pulls cooler air from the outside of your case to increase the amount of heat dissipated by the radiator. On the rear of the front housing you will see a small pump. At 67 x 47 x 29mm, it is incredibly small and helps keep the overall size of the Domino fairly compact. With the pump running, the unit is practically inaudible. The pump speed stays about the same and the noise levels of it are consistently low. CoolIT’s original Freezone was plagued by a loud pump but that’s ancient history and the Domino here is light years ahead in terms of noise levels. The pump also has a long 50,000/hour life utilizing ceramic bearings and weighs only about 57g.

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CoolIT Domino A.L.C.
Highslide JS

CoolIT Domino A.L.C.
Highslide JS

CoolIT Domino A.L.C.
Highslide JS

CoolIT Domino A.L.C.

The waterblock itself is rather thin and the tubing on the Domino is ¼” (inside diameter).  The diameter of the tubing here is rather small if you were to use a full liquid cooling system that would include a reservoir, and especially if you were cooling more than just a CPU.  However, given the self-contained setup here and who it is being marketed toward, in addition to the cost, the ¼” tubing should do just fine for most users.  Obviously, more hardcore enthusiasts prefer 3/8” or ½” but then again those people would be advanced users and probably have their own custom setup anyways.

The LCD screen allows you to view numerous pieces of information in black lettering on a blue back-lit LCD. All the information you would need to view is located on this screen. One note here is that the unit cannot tell you what your CPU temperature is, but this is no different than any other water cooling setup.  You would use your favorite software to do that, but we only mention it for the novices that may not be aware of this subtle but important difference.  The Domino’s display tells you what the coolant temperature is, not the CPU temperature.  Lastly, the LCD tells you when there is a problem by placing a caution sign on the screen.

LCD

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