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BFG EX-1000

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Posted September 11, 2009 by Jake in Cases & PSU

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by Jake
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Exterior

The EX-1000 unit is coated in a black, high-gloss mirror finish, which means that it is very prone to fingerprint marks. The overall aesthetic in an all-black looks gorgeous, and this power supply will look right at home in just about any case setup. Additionally, the finish is reasonably rather scratch-resistant, as I did give it a good push with a screwdriver to test it out. This may not be the wisest move, but I’ve done it so you don’t have to. Thankfully, it came away unscathed, though I wouldn’t recommend giving your kilowatt power supply much of a beating with gear from the toolbox. The EX-1000 is not very large, particularly for a kilowatt unit where we’ve seen much larger units, so there are no concerns about space issues inside your case (unless you’re going with a smallform case for some reason).

Highslide JS

BFG EX-1000
Highslide JS

BFG EX-1000
Highslide JS

BFG EX-1000
Highslide JS

BFG EX-1000

The front of the unit is where the action is, as we see the modular cable interface.  The cable connectors are the fairly standard "click-in" type and identify which cables mate to the connections available. The EX-1000 isn’t fully modular, as the 24-pin and 8 and 4-pin ATX cables are hard-wired to the unit. It’s interesting that BFG has gone with an 8 + 4-pin setup rather than a 4 + 4 with motherboards having more than one connector are extremely rare at this point in time (the EVGA Classified X58 comes to mind).

What’s perhaps more interesting is that there are also 2 x 6+2-pin cables, a Molex cable string, and a SATA cable string also hard-wired to the unit. The rationale here is based likely on the fact that everyone’s setup will be using these basic cables so why not just connect them anyways? True, but I suppose if people wanted a wired unit they’d just buy one and save some money in the process. Further, the hard-wired Molex cable string has a floppy connector on it. Who uses this anymore, even for the rare modern sound card that requires one? Really it should be relegated to the actual modular connectors, and keep a straight SATA-only hardwire. In any event, I suppose this is nitpicking, and this doesn’t really terribly affect the cable management inside a case unless you’re almost fanatical about the tidiness of your setup like I am.

The modular cables are all sleeved in a black mesh, and are suitably covered near the end of the connectors. There is a full complement of cables, including 3 – 6-pin and 3 – 6+2-pin connectors needed for the latest high-end graphics cards in multi-GPU SLI/Crossfire setup (we’ll be doing just that during testing). All the cables are sleeved here in a black colour.

Highslide JS

BFG EX-1000
Highslide JS

BFG EX-1000

The cable lengths for the BFG EX-1000 are a bit on the short side, each running about 19 or 20 inches to the connector. It’s been our experience that 19 inches is the absolute minimum for a kilowatt unit since they’re often used in full tower cases and can be extremely difficult to reach the hardware if care is taken to route the cables out of sight. 21 inches would be preferred as we think that’s a more suitable length from our experience. As a result, you may have a bit of a tough time routing some cables behind the motherboard tray if you have a tall tower with a bottom-mounted power supply setup, so just keep it in mind.

Looking at the specifications we see that the EX-1000 has 4 +12V rails at 36A, and at 984W combined there is 82A available. That is slightly on the lower end for kilowatt power supplies but it is sufficient, providing more than enough juice for the hungriest of systems, including overclocked Quad Core CPUs and dual graphics card setups in Crossfire or SLI. In particular, the 36A available on each 12V rail should prevent any overdraw problems that could occur on a multi-rail setup that typically offers lower amperage on each.
We also see that the connectors are fully labeled to avoid any confusion or accidentally plugging in a connector to the wrong slot.

Highslide JS

BFG EX-1000
Highslide JS

BFG EX-1000

The rear of the unit features honeycombed perforations to allow for increased airflow from the fan to exhaust the hot air out the rear of your case. There is also a basic rocker on/off power switch . We also see the unit’s specifications on the side and that 984W is available for the power hungry 12V rails. Overall the EX-1000 is fairly weighty, always a good sign, particularly when it’s a monster of a unit that should be enough to power a small reactor inside your system. It’s definitely not the heaviest we’ve seen nor the lightest, so my guess is we’ll not see huge heatsinks when we open up the EX-1000.

Let’s take a look on the inside.

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